Each year, I do a little retrospective of what I’ve enjoyed that year (even if it was produced earlier), and this year I’m doing it a little early in case you want to buy gifts for that special person in your life who is exactly like me.

Let’s start with the books!

The Dark Tower series, by Stephen King

gsThis year, I listened to the entire Dark Tower series on Audible and it was wonderfully strange and moving — a beautiful combination of medieval, post-apocalyptic, and Western sensibility with complex heroism and difficult consequences. I loved it as a story of a man learning how to reconcile his life’s obsession with the safety of the people with him on the journey — which, of course I did, given my personal history.

All seven books are odd and I’ll admit some parts are better than others. I especially enjoyed Wizard and Glass and Wolves of the Calla, but there are beautiful moments spread through every one.

As a writer, I’m fascinated by the obviously intuitive nature of these stories: it’s hard to believe King planned them very deeply, and they seem to be the result of him listening more than writing. That means that certain things get more attention than they should and others get less, and sometimes the endings seem a little ill-fitting. It doesn’t really bother me, though; it’s a roughly-hewn story like a canoe you’d chop with a hatchet from a fallen tree — somehow richly connected to reality. 

Various titles, by John D. MacDonald

I promise I’m not obsessed by Stephen King, BUT ol’ SK has mentioned more than once how much he admires John D. MacDonald’s work. If you wonder where King learned his trick of capturing the delicious gossipy detail that makes his characters seem real, it’s all in MacDonald’s stories.bc

My favorite so far is Murder in the Wind about people with deadly secrets who hole up in an abandoned house as a hurricane passes over. I also like the Travis McGee novels about the beach bum private fixer who does weird investigatory favors for people from time to time, but fair warning: they’ve got a mid-century sensibility.

I Am Providence, by Nick Mamatas

pYou know that old quotation “If you can’t say something good about someone, come sit right here by me?” This book is like sitting at the far corner of a Lovecraftian convention ballroom with someone who has the same entirely appropriate affection/disdain for it that you do. Yes, it’s a murder mystery that takes place at such a convention, but it’s also a purified sample of everything good (10%) and awful (90%) about the “community.”

It’s like Catch-22 but for Lovecraft fandom instead of the Army.

The Fisherman, by John Langanf

One of the things I found disappointing about Boy Scouts was that I never got a cool sublime experience of awe and horror in the woods. John takes care of that here with a man who goes into the wild for answers he doesn’t expect. It’s a beautifully lyrical book and it will make you wonder if you’re missing something by not going fishing. Then you’ll come back to your senses.

The Glittering World, by Robert Levy

gwThis book is a lot like Robert himself: cool, sophisticated, perceptive, funny, and just credulous enough to see the fey lurking on the edge of your summer retreat. I love the slow creeping intrusion of the strange here, and Robert never forgets how people are still people (troubled, petty, jealous, feebly and selfishly heroic) even in the presence of the wondrous.